Quincy Historical Society
Quincy Historical Society
4.5
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  • Quincy Center • 3 phút đi bộ
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377 trong vòng 5 km
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86 trong vòng 10 km

4.5
22 đánh giá
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9
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DuvLady
Dunnellon, FL51 đóng góp
Cặp đôi
Lovely museum of local history. We learned so much on our visit. The lady there was so welcoming and helpful. But I liked that it was a self-guided tour, and we could go at our own pace
Đã viết vào 19 tháng 9, 2022
Đánh giá này là ý kiến chủ quan của thành viên Tripadvisor chứ không phải của Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor thực hiện kiểm tra đánh giá.

Maurene_K
Dover, NH9.774 đóng góp
On vacation in Massachusetts with a friend from the area, we went to the Quincy Historical Society & Museum after visiting the newly-opened City of Quincy Welcome Center.

On numerous past trips to Quincy, I’d often admired the Gothic Revival architecture of the building that houses the Quincy Historical Society. On this vacation, I finally had enough time in one day's plans to spend about two hours there.

The building was formerly the Adams Academy which was built in 1869. And, before that, it was the site of the birthplace of John Hancock and later home of Josiah Quincy Sr. and Josiah Quincy, Jr. The home was destroyed by fire in 1760.

The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The society houses a museum on Quincy history.

Admissions were inexpensive:
$3.00 - Adults
$1.50 - Seniors & Students
FREE - Children

We toured the permanent exhibit titled Quincy: Of Stone, Of Ships, Of Minds. The title sums up European settlement in the area.

As a historian interested primarily in Colonial times, the American Revolution, and War of 1812, I found the Quincy Historical Society’s museum very interesting. I went it though all the displays at a very leisurely pace, taking in everything.

We began with a display on some Native American history about the Massachusett community of Algonquin. In the spring and summer, they lived in the high ground on the south side of Quincy Bay. Near the shore, they grew maize, beans, and squash. In fall and winter, they lived inland near Great Blue Hill.

There was a chart about the period from 1602, when European ships began showing up along the New England Coast, through establishment of a Pilgrim colony in Quincy in 1625, and to1633, when local sachem Chickataubot/Chickatawbut and a great number of the Massachusett died during a smallpox epidemic.

One exhibit recounted the controversy over Thomas Morton, who had established a trading post in what’s now the Merrymount section of Quincy. Gov. Bradford was critical of him; Morton was critical of the Pilgrims. Morton was deported twice and returned only to be arrested and imprisoned in what is now York, Maine where he died.

Another exhibit told the story of another controversial figure: Anne Hutchinson. I was familiar with her story. Her husband was landholder in the Mount Wollaston area. She was a Puritan religious reformer who was a leading figure in the Antinomian Controversy which caused turmoil throughout the Massachusetts Bay Colony from 1636 to 1638. She was tried and banished from the colony. She resettled in Rhode Island with the Roger Williams followers. She eventually moved to New Amsterdam in New York when she learned that the Puritans planned on taking over Rhode Island after Roger Williams died.

One of the pieces of furniture on display was a William & Mary side chair made of maple and oak in the late 1600’s. I thought it was in good condition.

Another display presented background on the four main industries in Quincy. In the 1640’s and 1650’s, there was the manufacture of wrought iron. Shipbuilding became a major industry in the 1700’s and continued with the General Dynamics Fore River Shipyard at its Quincy location from 1901 to 1986. Quarrying of granite was underway in the 1750’s. Manufacture of glass took place in the Germantown Glassworks in the 1750’s. We saw several bottles from that period. All were in dark color.

Another display was on the Quincy family from Colonial Period. There was a lineage chart. Nearby was a painting of The Bethel, the ship that built the fortunes of Edmund Quincy IV and Josiah Quincy.

Another display had write-ups on three patriots with local ties: Samuel Adams, John Hancock, and Josiah Quincy, Jr.

One curious artifact was a cradle given by the granddaughter of John Adams. It is believed to be the cradle of John Adams; however, the info card with it states that the National Park Service claims to have his cradle at the Adams National Historical Park.

I really liked authentic belongings of the Adams family. A vest and neck stock belonging to John Adams was in a sealed glass case along with a sauceboat that John and Abigail acquired in Europe. There was also a short petticoat that belonged to Abigail.

As someone who studied the violin, I admired the well-preserved violin in a sealed glass case. It belonged to John Briesler, who was in the militia and Continental Army. He also worked for John Adams.

Another artifact I liked was a sea bag reportedly made for John Quincy Adams when he travel on the ship named Boston during his 1778 trip to France.

I marveled at the well-preserved first edition of John Adams’s “Defense of the Constitutions of the United States.”

There were two interesting items that were commonplace in homes in the early days. The first was a fire bucket. The second was a Pounce Box. The oddly-named item held powder that would be sprinkled on paper to keep the ink from running.

Another sealed glass case held a teacup used by Abigail Adams. Nearby was a pair of riding breeches worn by John Adams.

In a separate room, the industries of Quincy were detailed.

Another display had information about Houghs Neck when it became a resort area in the 1800’s.

A large case held a model of the Red Cloud, the last and largest square-rigged built in Quincy in 1877.

The final area had displays on well-known businesses founded in Quincy.

The first was Howard Johnson’s, founded in 1925 as a pharmacy with a soda fountain. Johnson decided to make his own ice cream; and, eventually, the 28 flavors were created. Then, he got the idea to open concession stands at beach areas. From there, he expanded to restaurants and hotels. His businesses flourished until well after his death in 1972.

The next was Grossman’s, a leading retailer of building materials.

The third was Dunkin’, founded as Dunkin’ Donuts in 1950. Of the three, it’s the only one still completely intact.

There is a society gift shop with some nice items. I got a print of a pen-and-ink drawing of the Adams Academy building, a canvas tote bag that has the same drawing for $6.00, a key chain, and a small rubber refrigerator magnet of an Entering Quincy road sign. The woman in charge said she had one of the magnets, too, on her refrigerator at home. My friend got two holiday gifts ~ one for the older son and one for his wife.

I thoroughly enjoyed my visit to the Quincy Historical Society’s museum.

I highly recommend a visit to anyone interested in history.

If you found this review helpful, please click THANK below.
Đã viết vào 1 tháng 10, 2021
Đánh giá này là ý kiến chủ quan của thành viên Tripadvisor chứ không phải của Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor thực hiện kiểm tra đánh giá.

pearl
Killingworth, CT108 đóng góp
Cặp đôi
Now the home of the historical society and in easy walking distance to Quincy center to visit other historical sites. Exhibition is set up for ease of reading and sequence of events. There is also quite a display about Howard Johnson - yes, the Howard Johnson of ice cream, restaurant and motel fame! Staff welcoming and readily available to answer questions.
Đã viết vào 20 tháng 4, 2019
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jcdcooks
Quincy, MA117 đóng góp
Cặp đôi
Quincy Historical Society is a great place to stop into when visiting the historical sites
in Quincy, MA. It has many historical papers, photos, items that were around back when President John Adams and family were living here. A lot of information to be found.
Đã viết vào 3 tháng 10, 2018
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Dale M
Boston, MA409 đóng góp
Gia đình
This was a great way to really take in the history around the birth of Quincy & also the vital role it played in shaping this great country.
Located right the center of Quincy, it's ideal for a visit before you do the Adams tour around the town.
Im a fan of most museums and this one did not disappoint.
There is an abundance of amazing information that's not overwhelming.
Đã viết vào 15 tháng 9, 2017
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RachelRaven
Boston, MA505 đóng góp
Một mình
The Quincy Historical Museum is located in the Adams Academy building, built in the 19th century and originally a boy’s school. On the ground floor is an exhibit,“Of Stones, of Ships, of Minds,” dedicated to Quincy’s granite and shipbuilding industries, and to its businesses Howard Johnson's and Dunkin' Donuts. The second floor is a small research library (non-lending) and archive of Quincy's past, including books, and deeds, maps, photos, programs. Anyone researching Quincy can make an appointment to access the collection. Those interested in architecture will enjoy the building’s Gothic Revival elements. The QHS sometimes hosts readings by local authors or programs of historical interest.
Đã viết vào 11 tháng 5, 2017
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Ray T
Quincy, MA960 đóng góp
Gia đình
There is so much history in Quincy to explore and experience, but no visit to Quincy would be complete with a stop and tour of the Quincy Historical Society. In fact, I recommend that it be your first stop as it is the best source of information about all the historical sites in Quincy. In addition, the society is housed in a spectactular example of period architecture in the Adam Academy building as well as being the birthplace of arguably one of our most important founding fathers, Mr. John Hancock.
Đã viết vào 12 tháng 1, 2017
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emholly
Southeastern Wisconsin149 đóng góp
Cặp đôi
We had an hour to wait for our Adams Historical Site Tour so we wandered over to the Quincy Historical Society. It is housed in a quaint historical building that used to house an academy. The exhibits covered the history of the city, famous residents (Quincy is the City of Presidents) and industrial contributions (home of Dunkin Donuts and Howard Johnson and lots of granite). Docents were informative and friendly. Ample parking.
Đã viết vào 6 tháng 7, 2016
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DevorahLeah
Quincy, MA157 đóng góp
Doanh nghiệp
I'm a big fan of local history, and if your research is about Quincy MA (home to John Adams, John Quincy Adams, and Abigail Adams), this small but fascinating museum is worth a trip. Located in a historic building that once housed a school called the Adams Academy, the museum has a thorough collection of documents, artifacts, memorabilia, and ephemera related to Quincy's history, and while it is especially relevant for historians, it also draws many people who are tracing their family's ancestral journey.

Visitors will find interesting historical exhibits on the first floor, and the museum also holds regular educational talks and tours. The director is very knowledgeable, and the staff gladly answer questions. Not far from the Quincy Center T station, the museum also has a small parking lot for those who are driving. I can't say enough good things about this little museum, and I applaud its ongoing efforts to preserve the history of Quincy.
Đã viết vào 8 tháng 2, 2016
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John G
Quincy, MA96 đóng góp
Cặp đôi
I have to say first off that I am bias being a member of this society,but if you are interested in Quincy's history,this has a lot to offer. The museum is located in just one room but enough to give you an insight into local history.
Đã viết vào 15 tháng 12, 2015
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